Accelerate! Structure and function of ALR Sequence (Chapters 10-15)

Note: The author has found the idea in this post problematic. This post is not deleted and kept as an archive.

The ALR sequence presents a process of exodus away from the status of being of rejecters. One question has troubled me for quite a while when I was reading the ALR sequence—the first verse of all chapters in the ALR sequence talks about the signs in the Book, but where’s the sign? Where can the sign go, as these chapters are repeating how people reject God’s message? I found one of the answers to the question, that the sign, or guidance, lies in the characteristics of God. Now I’m talking about another answer to this question—the sign lies in a trend within the ALR sequence.

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Second Wave of Islamic Reform—Part I: About the First Wave

I cried; I haven’t been crying for a really long time. I cried, because I bickered with my parents on Mother’s Day firstly because of the differences between Christianity and Islam, and secondly because I thought my parents would limit my freedom to do what I like when I go back home for summer holiday. The next day, I got my mom’s email about her complex mood. She said I was not grateful. I broke into tears when I read this sentence by the end of her email: “You’re doing religious reform, so why aren’t you changing yourself?! You’re still complaining about your mother’s discipline, while I never complain about others; I always reflect on how I didn’t educate you well.” True, I don’t understand that my parents are busy all the day to help students and children (although this has an evangelical nature) and find opportunities to earn money, so they can give me a better life. They feel so guilty that they’re not able to give me a better life. While they’re busy all the day, saving money by not having meat for dinners and not buying new clothes, I still sleep late so often and I urged my parents to spend more time swimming with me. Meanwhile, I realized that we Quranists are not doing well; we need a second wave of Islamic reform. In Part I, I’m attempting to summarize the current scenario of the first wave of Islamic reform, and then I’m suggesting reasons why we’re not doing well in this first wave, and in Part II, which is in the category “Exegesis and Theory,” I’m proposing the second wave of Islamic reform.

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We care for our environment?

I question. Is what we believe to be environmental friendly indeed environmental friendly? And is being environmental friendly Islamic? I’m also motivating members in Quran De Novo to write more posts on applying the Islamic principles in real life, including real life experiences, as Islam advocates an active lifestyle; charity and fighting for peace and justice are emphasized along with the system of Monotheism in the first five – and one of the most important group of – chapters in the Quran. I think the first five chapters already explained the core of the system of God, and the later chapters are elevating us to higher levels of being, or perhaps the later chapters constitute a training plan for the soul, just like exercises after core concepts in a math book. (Warning: I’m heavily relying on the theory of evolution in this post) 

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What God is not

By Lambda Moses

Flying through the breeze, along the stretch of South California coast, with the blue crystal waves lining the road, suddenly, I arrived at Getty Villa, a 1st Century Roman villa that traveled through time and landed in 21st Century. I forgot about my modern clothes, my camera, and my phone, for I felt like an ancient Greek or Roman god, just like the numerous statues of Zeus, Venus, Muses, Dionysius, exhibited in the Villa in model temples and exhibition halls. I knew that I was not a god, nor are those sculptures. But what I saw and felt was a faulty understanding about God. In this article, I’m discussing what God is not according to the Quran.

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Me, my approach, and how I got here

Note: this author no longer holds one or more views in this post, but this post is kept as an archive.

About me

My name is Lambda Moses (pen name), and I’m an undergraduate student in UCLA. I haven’t decided my major yet. I was raised as an atheist by atheist parents in China, but I converted Sunni Islam in April 2010. My parents strongly opposed my conversion, and tried every means – including threatening to abandon me or not letting me to go to college – to drive me out of Islam. As they failed every means, and they knew that both Islam and Christianity believe in God, they converted Christianity in October 2011, hoping to let me worship the same God in a different and a more “acceptable” way. With the encounter of Christianity, I began to question Sunni Islam, especially the rituals, which are not so pronounced in Christianity. But I had problem with the Trinity, and I still didn’t want to give up the Quran, though I didn’t understand it. So I googled how to pray according to Quran alone. Then I hit Edip Yuksel, whose article “Manifesto for Islamic Reform” (http://www.19.org/578/manifesto-for-islamic-reform/) convinced me to give up Hadith.

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Chapter 2 and the Mentality of Monotheists

By Lambda Moses

All religions teach love, kindness, and charity, but most religions want followers to follow their authority as sheep. One thing special about the Quran, is that it encourages you to question and think on your own. This is why some people claim that Islam is not a religion, and this is why many Quranist scholars, like Edip Yuksel, also advocate critical thinking. In this article, I’m sharing my thought about how Chapter 2 lays down the foundation of the Monotheist’s mentality, of not self-righteous, not blind following, and actively seek the truth. You might find this article hard to follow and kind of messy, for my approach based on structure is not yet mature.

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